No More Biopsy Blues: Perspective

2019 marks the 6th year of being declared cancer-free, following a bout w/breast cancer. Recently, I think more often about what it took to arrive at this point. When the radiologist, God bless her, talked about her future endeavors while all the while confirming that my progress was sure, it was as if we were old friends. Those ALL CLEARs sound good to me, so she can talk about whatever she wants!

Now, let’s get to the crux of the matter. I’m wondering why breast cancer – no, all cancers – have become so prevalent over the last 30 years. My first thought is environmental – car emissions, manufacturers lying about how pollution-free their vehicles are, or factories sending out more toxins in the air. Take your pick. Everything that we know that aggravates the condition, is still on the market. They aren’t being removed from circulation, nor is additional information being provided as to its danger; at least no more than we already have been told. Consider how much money has been raised for ‘cancer research.’ You mean after billions of dollars, nothing’s been discovered yet? Or, which is more likely, something is discovered constantly but not allowed to get to the market? I’d bet on the latter.

Why? We all know why, whether we admit it or not – CORPORATE GREED. It’s so entrenched at this point, they really don’t care if you live or die. Big data has calculated how much you’ll spend during your lifetime. Then the insurance tables calculate how long you’ll live. At the point where you realize you’ve been screwed, it’s almost too late. BUT – it’s never too late to change yourself, is it? That’s what this forum is about – making changes to a  healthier lifestyle, based on verifiable information. What you need to be here is an open mind and the ability to intelligently analyze the info we provide and what you might get elsewhere.

I look forward to bringing knowledge that will help you navigate this journey of life healthier and more productively. Let’s use those diagnoses as a starting point to recreate our lives, so that it becomes a blip on the continuum of life as we look back and say, ‘I obliterated the cancer in my life many years ago!’